How to live transcribe Google Meet calls

It’s quite tough to take notes while also listening to the often-imperfect audio. Fortunately, an artificial intelligence-based alternative is already accessible.

Here’s how to real-time transcribe Google Meet calls.

You’ve been missing out if you haven’t heard about Otter.ai. The gadget has been around for a long and is a well-kept secret among tech writers. I’ve used it myself when conducting face-to-face interviews and needed a transcript to turn the conversation into a written article. Otter.ai also lets you search for, play, edit, organize, and share conversations from any device. It’s a lifesaver in this game, believe me.

Otter.ai's new Chrome extension can transcribe Google Meet calls in real  time - The Verge

The new Otter.ai Chrome Extension for Google Meet now transcribes and captions your video meetings in real-time, essentially eliminating the need for you to take notes. If you wish to go back over the audio later, you can save the recorded transcript to your Otter account. Just make sure to inform your coworkers that you are recording them!

In my opinion, this is the best automatic live transcribing and note-taking tool for in-person and now virtual meetings. Otter.ai is currently available in English on the Web, iOS, Android, Zoom, and Google Meet. It is included at no additional cost in all plans.

How to use Otter.ai to transcribe Google Meet calls

To begin, install the Otter-ai Chrome Extension from the Chrome Web Store. If the symbol does not appear in the top right corner of your Chrome browser after installing the extension, you can pin it by clicking on the jigsaw icon. When you open Google Meet, all you have to do now is click on the extension and pick record. The caption will be recorded in real-time in the upper right corner of your screen. You can also change the size of the text.

Of course, you’ll need an Otter.ai account for this to operate. The recorded transcript is automatically kept in your Otter account once you login in. It’s also worth noting that Google has its own native method for recording transitions.