16 Foods for Beautiful Skin 2

Continue from part 1.

beautiful skin2

Hello my dear readers today we shall be continuing from last week’s edition on foods for beautiful skin.

Red Bell Peppers:

red bell pepperA medium-size red bell pepper boasts more than 200 percent of the daily value of vitamin C. Eating more vitamin C-rich foods may help to protect skin cells from the sun’s harmful rays as research suggests that vitamin C may promote the repair of DNA that’s been damaged by UV rays.

Carrots:

carrotCarrots contain the carotenoids beta carotene and lycopene—both of which may shield your skin against UV damage. In one study, participants who were exposed to UV light had almost 50 percent less skin reddening after they drank about 1 2⁄3 cups of carrot juice in addition to their regular diet, for 10 to 12 weeks. So start eating those carrots!

 Soymilk:

soyabeanSoymilk helps to preserve skin-firming collagen because it is rich in isoflavones. In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, mice fed isoflavones and exposed to ultraviolet radiation had fewer wrinkles and smoother skin than mice that were exposed to UV light but didn’t get isoflavones. The researchers believe that isoflavones help prevent collagen breakdown.

 Tuna:

tunaTuna—and other omega-3-rich fish—may help keep your skin looking youthful and prevent skin cancer. EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), one of the omega-3 fats in fatty fish, has been shown to preserve collagen, a fibrous protein that keeps skin firm. And according to Homer S. Black, Ph.D., professor emeritus in the department of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston EPA in combination with the other omega-3 in fish, DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), helps to prevent skin cancer by reducing inflammatory compounds that can promote tumor growth. I always aim to eat two servings of fatty fish each week: not only are the omega-3s good for your skin, they’re good for your heart too.

  Broccoli:

broccoliEating more vitamin C-rich foods, such as broccoli, may help to ward off wrinkles and age-related dryness. Vitamin C’s skin-smoothing effects may be due to its ability to mop up free radicals produced from ultraviolet rays and also its role in synthesizing collagen, a fibrous protein that keeps skin firm.

 Spinach:

spinachSpinach boasts lutein, a carotenoid that protects your skin from UV damage. When buying spinach, pick the one right up in the light: new research, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, reveals that spinach stored continuously under the light for as little as three days boasted higher levels of vitamin C and preserved levels of vitamin K, E, folate and the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin.

  Sardines:

sadinesSardines are one of the healthiest foods we can consume: they’re packed with the omega-3s, as well as vitamin D, which is found naturally in very few foods. The omega-3s may shield cell walls from free-radical damage caused by UV rays. Sardines are also quick to reproduce and have rebounded since the Pacific fishery crashed in the 1940s, so much so they are one of Seafood Watch’s “Super Green” sustainable choices.

Pumpkin:

pumpkinLike lycopene, beta carotene—the compound that makes pumpkins orange—protects your skin from UV damage. Beta carotene is also converted to vitamin A in the body, which helps to keep your eyes, bones and immune system healthy.

0 Comments

Leave a Comment

Login

Welcome! Login in to your account

Remember me Lost your password?

Don't have account. Register

Lost Password

Register